Mileage

Yeah… so that whole switching to Wednesdays thing didn’t work out so well. Oops. Anyway…

About a year and a half ago I was in a D&D 3.5 game. I was the only one with a hard copy of the Player’s Handbook I just left it at the house we played at. It’s been there ever since until yesterday when I finally got around to picking it up. George, the guy who was holding on to it, made sure to point out some light damage to the corners the book took since I left it at his place.

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He apologized, and I said I was ok with it. And I meant it, too.

I used to be pretty uptight about the condition of my game books, before I realized that what wears books out is getting used. The books I have that are in the best condition are the ones I haven’t really used very much. Alternatively, the book I’ve gotten the most use of, the one that I used to carry with me every where I went, Vampire: the Masquerade (Revised Edition), is in terrible condition.

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That, my friends, is mileage!

So don’t worry about frayed corners or worn bindings or scratched covers. It’s just what love looks like.

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2 thoughts on “Mileage

  1. How to judge mileage and ‘love’ in the current era? My table top group all brought tablets and/or laptops. We were still playing a table top game (Pathfinder), rolling real dice, real GM utilizing a white board to explain just how screwed our party was – but the books? There was a physical set – they got used maybe once a session…or just held up the tortilla chips. Hyperlinked PDF versions of the books were the go-to, or apps that have all the same info, well organized at the touch of a screen.
    I will always buy the core books to the games I play – to read through it once. Maybe reference from time to time, but largely its that digital copy that sees the most ‘love’.

    • Nowadays that’s very true, most of my game books these days are PDFs, and mileage is less tangible. I guess it could be measured through familiarity? Like the less frequently you actually need to look things up.

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